Aquarium & Tropical Fish Site

Aldrovanda vesiculosa
Waterwheel

 Age of Aquariums > Aquarium Plants

Photos & Comments

Aldrovanda_vesiculosa_1.jpg (15kb)
Photo Credit: Alex Kawazaki

Name: Aldrovanda vesiculosa
Origin: Europe, India, Australia, Africa, Japan

Care Gravel Light
Hard None Bright

Comment

I have kept one of these for a month now. I needed to buy a new one every week for about a month on account that the plant seems to be a delicacy for angle fish. I finally found that if you feed the angels carrot shredding before introducing this plant it seems to give them a nasty enough taste to keep them away. All the other fish in my tank don't seem to bother this plant.

Contributed by Crawford Clarkson
Comment

Fantastic carnivorous plant. It contains trigger hairs that create an expulsion of air from their sack, causing water in the immediate area (including what triggered the hair) to be sucked in. Easy to maintain, free floating, love baby brine shrimp and have even taken fish fry. Good conversation topic with visitors.

Contributed by Terry Nicholls
Comment

The Waterwheel is an insectivorous plant, meaning it eats bugs. Water fleas and mosquito larvae are good prey. The insects will be lured into the transparent leaves, and become ensnared. Afterward, digestion occurs. Like all carnivorous plants, it does not need bugs to live; it just grows more slowly without them. Waterwheels grow in very acidic water, somewhere between 5.5 and 6.2. They also need to live with other aquatic plants. Aquatic Utricularia or Bladderworts are good tank mates. If given enough light, they will become a beautiful red color.

Contributed by Reece Halfmann
Comment

There are only 2 varieties, the Hungarian and the Japanese. Also it is correct that they are carnivorous and do not really need any fertilizer as they get food from the protozoans they trap. Think of them as a hornwort that is carnivorous. You could try Utricularia graminifolia which usually carpets the aquarium floor in 2-3 weeks. They seem to like acidic water better.

Contributed by Ken Chui

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