Aquarium & Tropical Fish Site

Thorichthys meeki
Firemouth Cichlid

 Age of Aquariums > Freshwater Fish > Firemouth Cichlid - Thorichthys meeki

Photos & Comments

Thorichthys_meeki_2.jpg (32kb)
Photo Credit: Andrea Dalbeck
Comment

The Meeki is a great fish to keep. I have 5 of them in a 450 litres community tank. Two of them are a couple with babies. Meekis are very good parents. In the beginning, when the babies had been very tiny (and they are really tiny) I thought I could call myself a happy woman, if 3 or 4 would survive. Nine weeks later, I am pondering what to do with about 40 very well developed little ones, which are already getting color, and look already definitely like little cichlids. Not only that they are growing pretty fast, they are learning very fast too. Everytime I enter the room, the whole bunch is beneath the feeding hole...like the parents. What really surprised me a lot is that, in my little family, Daddy cared and still cares much more for his fry than Mummy does. He battles with two 14 cm Ancistrus (and usually wins) and at least 50% of my 1.8 metres tank belong to him and his folks. But I can't say that he's overly aggressive. As long as the other fishes keep away. Even though when the flashlight of my camera is too much for him, I can call myself lucky that there is a glasswall between me and him. Otherwise he would have bitten me into my nose many times.

Contributed by Andrea Dalbeck
Comment

Firemouths are really great fish and wonderful to watch. They can be a bit territorial, but it all depends on the fish. Mine have lived peacefully most of the time. I have 4 Firemouths, 2 Albino Tiger Oscars, 2 Black Tiger Oscars, 1 Green Terror, 1 Jack Dempsey, 1 Convict Cichlid and 10 Tiger Barbs in an 850 liter tank. They get along great.

Contributed by Aubrey Kipp
Comment

I bought a Firemouth (2.5 cm) about 5 months ago now. Originally he was in a 75 L tank with a pair of Jack Dempseys (each 5 cm at the time). Initially the fish all got along fine until the Dempseys started to grow quickly and the Firemouth did not. The small Firemouth took a good beating from the larger fish, but still tried to stand his ground on occasion (the gill flaring is a fantastic display). Eventually I moved the Dempseys to a 200 L tank to better suit their size. The little Firemouth (now 5 cm) has survived several tankmates (all South American Cichlids and all victims of bacterial infections) since the removal of the Dempseys and is now the dominant fish amongst a group of a small Convicts and Firemouths. In conclusion, I suggest that Firemouths be kept with other slow growing Cichlids of similar size, but do not underestimate them because they are natural born fighters and survivors.

Contributed by Jason Koester
Comment

I have a small baby firemouth. I was worried at first because he was extremley shy, so it's a good idea to have a lot of hiding places to avoid them being stressed out, but now both my male and female are always coming out and swimming around my 150 litre tank. I feed mine a variety of flake and bloodworms. They tend not to go for pellets. It's easy to tell apart the male and female because the male has pointed anal and dorsal fins. They have a relaxed temperament, but can get a little agressive in spawing season. These fish look great and are the trophy of my tank.

Contributed by (no name given)
Comment

I have had one of these critters for almost a year now,and they sure don't grow very much. Other than that he is very friendly and seems to get along with many other cichlids. For their size they can hold their own in most situations. I would recommend anyone interested in smaller SA cichlids to try these.

Contributed by Christin Patrin
Comment

The firemouths are a very cool fish to have in your tank. They are not overly aggressive, but seem to have the "live and let live" motto. They accept a wide variety of water conditions. They are active and colorful, as well as an overall great fish. I recommend not putting them with the " giants". They do best with blue acaras, severums, and other semi-aggressive cichlids, although in a large tank they can hold their own with the big boys.

Contributed by a visitor



 Pages:  1  | 2  | 3  | 4 

oF <=> oC in <=> cm G <=> L