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Pond Size for 10 Fantails
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Guppylover
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Joined: 11 Dec 2003
Location: Western Australia

PostPosted: 2004.01.08(Thu)22:45    Post subject: Pond Size for 10 Fantails Reply with quote

I want to get a pond that will be able to keep 10 Fantails inside, how large does the pond have to be? Confused
It would need plants right? What type? Confused
What about the filter? How large? Confused
Would the pond need a heater? Confused
I have lots of cats around the neibourhood so I need protection right? Confused
Sorry about all the questions, but I want to get everything right with my first pond Very Happy
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anonapersona
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: 2004.01.09(Fri)9:51    Post subject: 20 fantails Reply with quote

Plan on about 300 gallons, with a filter that is sized for 300 gallons or more, pump rate of turnover one pond volume in 2 hours.

Plants are good for the fish, messy for the filter, so increase the filter capacity for that.

Make it deep enough to not freeze, and at least 2 feet deep to prevent cats and raccoons and such from eating fish. Fish will need cover from birds, also, so plants and PVC tubes or something solid is nice to offer them.

Get a filter that you can reach and remove for frequent cleaning, with a handle or rope or something so you can get it if it is inside the pond.

Aeration is important, so the submersible pump with a fountain attachement is nice, I got one for my 300 gallon pond at DrFosterSmith.com for about $45. There is a sponge prefilter on mine but that is not sufficient for filtration, some units have better sized sponge filters. I also have an exteranl canister filter, but I don't like it much.

Shade is important, but you don't want leaves. You need electricity and a GFI procted circut.
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nonamethefish
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003

PostPosted: 2004.01.11(Sun)21:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem with using fantails for a pond is that they are more delicate than commons and easy targets for cats, herons etc. Cats love my backyard(sigh)...if they get into yours I'd reccomend using commons or comets. You could protect them, or course, but that would be pretty unsightly. The pond(depending on where you live) should be at least 5 feet deep, preferably more in its deepest point.
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Guppylover
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Joined: 11 Dec 2003
Location: Western Australia

PostPosted: 2004.01.12(Mon)21:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know fantails are more of the delicate type than the comets or the commons but I'll keep with them.
Thanks foe asnswering all the questions though Razz
All I like to know now is what type of plants go OK in a pond?
Because most plants need lots of light. Confused
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SherryNE
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Joined: 05 Feb 2003

PostPosted: 2004.01.13(Tue)12:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elodea, parrot feather, lily's, lotus, horsetail...they are tons. Check with your local nursery.
Duckweed, moneywort/bacopa....mint.....the list goes on, and on, and on.
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nonamethefish
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003

PostPosted: 2004.01.18(Sun)9:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Water lilys would be the best bet, though they are pricy. Water lettuce may work if its not to cold, or if you've got a planted take for them to live in for the winter. Water hyacinths are one season use plants unless you want to try to overwinter them. That is a pain(need a tank with a high cover and lots of bright light and ferts)...they are cheap anyway! Lots of aquarium plants can grow outside in the summer.

Douglas iris, marsh marigold, and other marginals can be used on the banks of the pond. My ponds left bank has a thick stand of taro, I don't understand why they cost so much! Every summer you have to cut runners to keep them out of the pond.
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Guppylover
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Joined: 11 Dec 2003
Location: Western Australia

PostPosted: 2004.01.20(Tue)0:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard from someone that all her lillies got eaten by the fish, how would you stop that?
Ans the Water Lettuce would be fine here because the weather is normally always hot Razz
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SherryNE
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Joined: 05 Feb 2003

PostPosted: 2004.01.20(Tue)12:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

I doubt that the goldfish managed to eat all of her lilies unless the lilies were ill or dying. They are pretty tough...most fish will just go for algae or softer plants.
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