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Math Problem...Water in a Python
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Cyradia
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

PostPosted: 2003.08.08(Fri)9:50    Post subject: Math Problem...Water in a Python Reply with quote

Here's a fun word problem for the whole family! I have a 75 foot python to facilitate my water changes. As you python fans know, the way it works is it acts as a syphon to take the dirty water out of the tank, and then I flip a switch and it acts as a hose to fill my tank back up with tap water. Now, when I flip the switch the entire length of the tube is filled with dirty tank water, which then is the first to get pumped back into the tank. So, the question is kids, how many dirty gallons of water is sitting in that tube when I flip the switch that I'm pumping back into my tank as "clean" water?

The tubing is approximately 3/4 inch in diameter.

(I love giving math problems to see how many different answers people come up with. Razz However, this is an issue I've often thought about since the last tank I like to do in my water swapping method is only a 20 gallon tank.)
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Mario
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Joined: 05 Feb 2003
Location: New York, NY, USA

PostPosted: 2003.08.08(Fri)9:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

volume=pi*r*r*h

It's roughly 20l or 5gal or 1 bucket full. Smile
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Cyradia
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

PostPosted: 2003.08.08(Fri)10:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I just used the formula for a cylinder too, but I got different numbers. Darn lying calculators!

volume = pi*r*r*h

r=.375 inches
h=900 inches

volume = 397.6 cubic inches

.01639 liters = 1 cubic inches

volume = 6.5 liters

3.785 liters = 1 gallon


volume = 1.7 gallons
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Mario
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Joined: 05 Feb 2003
Location: New York, NY, USA

PostPosted: 2003.08.08(Fri)10:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, just estimating the volume, yours sound much more likely to be true. I guess I should not convert everything into metric nunbers and then try to convert back. Sad

Embarassed It was the radius where I went wrong. I took the diameter instead.
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anonapersona
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: 2003.08.08(Fri)18:53    Post subject: less than that Reply with quote

Is that 3/4 inch the internal diameter or the external diameter? If it is the outside measurment, the Python contains even less than the 1.7 gallons calculated.
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Tommy
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: San Jose, CA

PostPosted: 2003.08.12(Tue)23:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to chime in late on this one, but I know what the answer *should* be...

Zero! if you do like I do and pull the vacuum tube out of the tank and prop it up where it isn't sucking water, a few seconds before flipping the switch you empty the entire hose...The thought of pumping dirty water back into the tank has always been intolerable...
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William
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: 2003.08.12(Tue)23:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tommy,

Your a bit of a slacker Wink I walk the the vacuum hose back to the sink coiling it around my arm and raise it above the tap level. I then reverse the flow and let the fresh tap water run into the drain for 30 seconds or so before I refill the tank Wink

Best regards,

William


Tommy wrote:
Sorry to chime in late on this one, but I know what the answer *should* be...

Zero! if you do like I do and pull the vacuum tube out of the tank and prop it up where it isn't sucking water, a few seconds before flipping the switch you empty the entire hose...The thought of pumping dirty water back into the tank has always been intolerable...

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