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DIY CO2
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naclh2ofly
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Joined: 07 Jun 2003
Location: MD's Eastern Shore, USA

PostPosted: 2003.06.08(Sun)13:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ansbach,
I've not used this recipe long but have followed other's posts(other forums) long enough to be confident with it. Did you check out the link?

The only thing I do different than most is I deliberately screw up the jello mix so it does not completely solidify. It is more like thick goo.

This current mix I used .75 tsp yeast. It has been going @ 30~40bpm for the past 3 weeks. The previous batch used .5 tsp yeast and went about 8 weeks @20~30bpm. Don't recall what the others were ... didn't keep track. I have yet to use brewers/wine yeast but others have. I don't now if I should bother playing around with different yeasts or not... this is just to get me by till I can afford a pressurized system without the hassle of remixing every 10 days.

Fred
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Ansbach
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Joined: 06 Jun 2003
Location: Colorado Springs, CO

PostPosted: 2003.06.08(Sun)20:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. I'm going to try your recipe with champagne yeast - I'll try and let you know how it goes...
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Atho
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Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Location: south-east texas

PostPosted: 2003.06.26(Thu)21:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve Hampton wrote:
For tanks that small, using your power filter is plenty efficient enough. Here's a drawing showing how to feed the gas into the siphon strainer of a typical power filter. You may find that you end up with too much CO2 in the 5G, you can adjust the recipe of the yeast syrup or add an airstone to "bubble away" some of the excess CO2.



So if you wanted more bubbles would you add more sugar? Or more yeast or both? How does that work exactly. Does the Yeast consume the sugar and leave CO2 as its waste product?
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Garrett
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Joined: 01 May 2003
Location: Austin, TX

PostPosted: 2003.06.27(Fri)7:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Atho, I'm still pretty new to DIY CO2 also, but I can tell you what I know. The yeast consumes the sugar and produces CO2 as waste. A given amount of yeast can only consume a certain amount of sugar in a given time, so if you add more sugar. If you add more sugar, you'll probably just be wasting sugar (this is what I was told from others on this board). Also, I believe the yeast die out after a period of time because the concentration of alcohol (also produced as waste) becomes too high in the CO2-producing mix. You can add a pinch of baking soda to extend the life of the mix. If you want more bubbles, you probably need to add more yeast (however, this will shorten the lifespan of your mix, causing it to start out very strong but drop off quickly, I speak from personal experience). In one of the previous replies on this post there was a recipe for a jello-based CO2 mix. I've tried that and it has lasted longer than the all-sugar ones. Also, just a note from some of my past experiences, if you're planning on doing DIY CO2, check your KH and pH values regularly. When I first started, my KH was too low (around 1 degree). I then found out that it should have been around 3-4 degrees (as a minimum). I now add a small amount of baking soda (sodium bicarbinate) to my tank to increase my KH level. Also, closely monitor your pH (which I didn't at first) as you start injecting CO2 because if your KH (carbonate hardness) is too low, you could have pretty drastic pH swings (I went from around 7.6 to about 6.0 in one night). Just some suggestions, hope this helps.
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sassy_sarie
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Joined: 24 Mar 2003

PostPosted: 2003.06.28(Sat)2:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

is it safe to add regular baking soda to the tank?
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Garrett
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Joined: 01 May 2003
Location: Austin, TX

PostPosted: 2003.06.28(Sat)9:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. From my experience, adding a small amount of normal baking soda will increase the KH levels of the tank. Granted, putting in too much is just as dangerous as putting in too much food, fish, plants, etc. But in a moderate amount (when needed) it is OK. Hope this helps.
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sassy_sarie
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Joined: 24 Mar 2003

PostPosted: 2003.06.28(Sat)21:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes, it does help. now I won't have to go out and buy relatively expensive KH buffing stuff
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RySites
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Joined: 11 May 2003

PostPosted: 2003.07.07(Mon)19:29    Post subject: Now that we're all here... Reply with quote

I've been sticking my output tube near my HOB filter. I've been noticing that my output doesn't come out if my tube falls too deep (which can be as little as an inch from where it works fine). Then my safety measures fire off and a full night's CO2 doesn't make it into the tank. Any idea what would cause the depth to be so critical? Capillary action, perhaps? Anyway around it? Thanks.
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naclh2ofly
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Joined: 07 Jun 2003
Location: MD's Eastern Shore, USA

PostPosted: 2003.07.08(Tue)5:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

RySites,
The deeper under water the greater the pressure needed to be over come.

Check your system for leaks.... you may not be producing enough CO2. I also stick my CO2 output directly into my HOB intake.

Fred
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Garrett
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Joined: 01 May 2003
Location: Austin, TX

PostPosted: 2003.07.08(Tue)7:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have the same thing happen in my tank. I've got my CO2 input tube going right into the intake of my power filter. I've noticed that when I'm doing my water changes, the inflow of CO2 increase as the water level decreases. However, I've never noticed the CO2 input to completely stop as I refill my tank. Maybe your safety measures are too weak and don't let enough pressure build up in the CO2 system before they "blow"? Or maybe you could try raising the point of injection (with respect to the surface level of the water)?
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