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KH/GH
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kjh90
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Joined: 15 Mar 2005
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)7:11    Post subject: KH/GH Reply with quote

I was curious how do you find KH and GH and what is significant about them.
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benedictj
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Joined: 05 Dec 2004
Location: new york, ny

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)7:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

You determine KH and GH using test kits. Typically, it involves taking a sample of water and adding a testing solution until it changes color (at least in the average non-lab kit).

The significance of each-

KH is supremely important because it stabilizes your pH. It is also known as buffering capacity or buffering. So, if your water has a low KH, your pH (at least in a the fish tank setting) is less stable, conversely if it is higher your pH is more stable. As a bench mark, 3 degress of KH, which is equal to approximately 54 ppm, is consider adequate buffering for low pH tanks. In general, the higher your KH, the higher your pH.

GH is important when selecting fish. Certain fish are designed (actually evolved, but that's a whole different can of worms) to thrive in water with high GH, like african rift lake cichlids. Other fish, like discus, are designed to live in water with very little gh. Many community fish, like common livebearers can adapt to life in either type of water. Hardness has a great deal of effect on a lesser known parameter called Electro Conductivity. Electro conductivity and hardness effect a fish's ability to osmoregulate. Omsoregulation, put loosely, is the process in which a fish retains its internal water. If a fish is placed in water with too high or too low a hardness and e.c. it can effect this ability and stress the fish, causing almost 'dehydration', and making it susceptable to disease.

It is important to note that KH and GH, while not connected chemically, typically have a relationship where if one is high, the other is as well. Mainly, this is a function of geology. When there is a high presence of magnesium and calcium in a water table, there are typically high carbon levels as well.

Anyway, that's it in a nutshell. There's a lot more too it, if you google around on it, you'll surely find more specific information and explination.
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kjh90
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Joined: 15 Mar 2005
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)8:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

So if my hardness tests 120 and my buffering tests 80 how do you convert that into KH and GH?
Thanks for the help.
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benedictj
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Joined: 05 Dec 2004
Location: new york, ny

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)8:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

To convert between ppm and german degrees just divide by 17.9. So-

Your KH is approximately 4.5
Your GH is 6.7

All in all, that's perfect water for most community fish.

My guess is that your pH is in the 7.2 range, right?
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kjh90
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Joined: 15 Mar 2005
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)11:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is about 7.4. Thanks for the help, and one more question. What is DH? I have seen it listed in some of the books I have on fish and haven't been able to figure out what it means.
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Darkblade48
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Joined: 21 Jun 2004
Location: Toronto, Ontario. Canada

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)11:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

kjh90 wrote:
It is about 7.4. Thanks for the help, and one more question. What is DH? I have seen it listed in some of the books I have on fish and haven't been able to figure out what it means.


I believe dH means "degrees hardness", but I may be wrong
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benedictj
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Joined: 05 Dec 2004
Location: new york, ny

PostPosted: 2005.04.24(Sun)13:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Darkblade48 wrote:

I believe dH means "degrees hardness", but I may be wrong


Exactly, dH means degrees hardness, which is the same as German degrees. One degree of hardness is equal to 17.9 ppm.

It also stands for designated hitter- go Yankees Laughing
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