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New-Guy Question
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SPIDEN
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Joined: 20 Mar 2005

PostPosted: 2005.03.20(Sun)21:56    Post subject: New-Guy Question Reply with quote

Alrighty, well I've fallen in love with the Madarin Fish and I'm curious if its a good idea for me, a new guy to fish keeping, to start off with a fish like that...

I've been looking around at some smaller tanks (10g, space reasons for college) and I was wondering if that would be OK...

I personally don't have a whole lot of knowledge of fish keeping but I do have 2 veteran fish keepers to back me up...

Right now I'm in the planning stages. I havn't made any comitments so any ideas on tank size, species... anything that a starter such as myself should do. Any comments would be cool or e-mail me at sonicdeathmonkey_357@hotmail.com

Thanks
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SLACkra
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

PostPosted: 2005.03.21(Mon)1:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

you would be able to keep a mandarin in a 10g aquarium HOWEVER you would only be able to keep on in a 10g if it has been weened onto foods such as bloodworms flake and other nutritous food items. Brine shrimp won't cut it there just not very nutrisous or if it was not eating prepared foods and was going for copods and small invertabrates that are commonly found living in or on life rock you would have to attach a large refugium basically a place for those little guys to live and make more of themselves.

also mandarin gobys are not begginer fish and such a small marine aquarium is not recomended for a bigginer. I started with a 32g aquarium, 30g+ is a basic rule for tank size for begginers. however now with much more experience I am able to have a very small aquarium succesfuly.

good luck and do lots of research,

andrew
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juice28
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Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Location: iowa city, IA

PostPosted: 2005.03.21(Mon)17:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

You'll be hard pressed to find someone that will tell you that's a good idea. I agree with above, that some mandarins will be weaned onto bloodworms and other such prepared foods, but even those specimens derive a large portion of their diet from live rock copepods (of which you'll have virtually zero of in a 10G). You should most definetly choose another species! Sorry to burst your bubble...
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tdfd
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Joined: 15 May 2004
Location: Seattle, Wa

PostPosted: 2005.03.21(Mon)22:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mandarins get pretty big, even if it could eat other food than pods. I wouldn't suggest one for a ten gallon. Maybe a 29gal but a 40gal would be more of the right shape.
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MarkLehr
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Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Location: Taylorsville, KY

PostPosted: 2005.03.23(Wed)22:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

SLACkra wrote:
you would be able to keep a mandarin in a 10g aquarium HOWEVER you would only be able to keep on in a 10g if it has been weened onto foods such as bloodworms flake and other nutritous food items.


As you know, I am a big fan of your posts.... normally. Cool

I disagree completely with this comment. The marine hobby has failed misearably to provide an adequate diet to this species. Bloodworms, flakes, brine, or anything else we have availabe commercially will not keep this fish alive for an extended period. Their natural diet on a reef is impossible to duplicate unless in a very large aquarium or an aquarium with a very mature refugium. This species is a hot button of mine, as I have strong opinions that they should not be kept in captivity. The success rate is extremely poor.

It is a testimant to your experience and knowledge Andrew that you have had some success with this species. But to duplicate this for most hobbyists is just not going to happen.
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