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Hard water resistant fish?
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Mellonhead
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Joined: 19 Nov 2004
Location: Toronto, Canada

PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)13:32    Post subject: Hard water resistant fish? Reply with quote

Hi all:

Glad I found this forum... found loads of information. I am starting my first aquarium (actually for my daughter). It's a 10 gal (40 liter) kit. It's almost finished cycling with three Zebra Danios doing the dirty work.

My question: I have hard water. Have not actually tested the pH, but judging by the results in this forum from other Southern Ontario residents, I expect it is around 8.0+ . Can anyone recommend small tropical fish that are hard water tolerant? Not sure I want to keep the Danios, 'cause they seem a bit too boisterous for a small tank.
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Puresouthern
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Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Location: Central Florida

PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)13:33    Post subject: Re: Hard water resistant fish? Reply with quote

Mellonhead wrote:
Hi all:

Glad I found this forum... found loads of information. I am starting my first aquarium (actually for my daughter). It's a 10 gal (40 liter) kit. It's almost finished cycling with three Zebra Danios doing the dirty work.

My question: I have hard water. Have not actually tested the pH, but judging by the results in this forum from other Southern Ontario residents, I expect it is around 8.0+ . Can anyone recommend small tropical fish that are hard water tolerant? Not sure I want to keep the Danios, 'cause they seem a bit too boisterous for a small tank.



Mollies like Hard alkaline water and tend to be hardy and adaptable Very Happy But wait for your tank to finish cycling before adding any. If you go wash your hair and get soap in your eyes thats what your Danios are going thru right now. IF you ever do another tank fishless cycling is best. I didn't the first time. Lost 11 fish Sad
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Huntress
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)13:36    Post subject: Re: Hard water resistant fish? Reply with quote

Best thing to do is ask how long your lfs keeps softer water loving fish. Most fish can and will adapt to hard water with high pH. I know Taratron keeps many a tetra in her liquid rock she calls water. Smile
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Mellonhead
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Joined: 19 Nov 2004
Location: Toronto, Canada

PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)13:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the suggestions.... there's a PetsMart nearby that has Mollies, so I'll take another look at them. Regarding fishless cycling... yes, like many I started out of complete ignorance and cruelly killed some Platies and Danios when the ammonia spiked (none now, just Nitrite). After that I hit the 'net to find out what happened and found out that to keep fish you have to be part Organic-Chemist and part Marine-Biologist lol! Felt bad about the dead fish, and would go fishless if I did it again.... but I'm trying to do it right from now on and do some research before making any purchases.

Thanks again,
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Puresouthern
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Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Location: Central Florida

PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)14:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mellonhead wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions.... there's a PetsMart nearby that has Mollies, so I'll take another look at them. Regarding fishless cycling... yes, like many I started out of complete ignorance and cruelly killed some Platies and Danios when the ammonia spiked (none now, just Nitrite). After that I hit the 'net to find out what happened and found out that to keep fish you have to be part Organic-Chemist and part Marine-Biologist lol! Felt bad about the dead fish, and would go fishless if I did it again.... but I'm trying to do it right from now on and do some research before making any purchases.

Thanks again,



If you can find somewhere besides a big chain like petsmart I would. I understand completely about the chemist -biology part LOL neither were my strongest suits. LOL Now if we could keep fish based on "History, English or Phys-Ed I'm your gal Wink I think most of us start out with the fish during cycle. We're such novice it never dawns on us that the store is selling us the fish that in all likely hood will die and then guess what.......your coming back to them for more fish. Also do not let them con you into chems and such. Most fish will adapt to anywater despite what your pH is. But your question was which fish like your type of water as it is, and mollies I know for sure. I was never a molly fan, but I found some dalmation mollies. Spotted just like a dog. They are so ugly they are cute. I have hard water with a high pH just like you. Good luck Very Happy
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haname
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)14:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mollies are not recommended for a 10 gallon or for beginners, though they do well in hard water.

Platies are ideal for a 10 gallon, hard water tank. I think it's a good idea to look for fish that thrive in the kind of water you already have, but as Huntress stated, most fish are adaptable.

There are some profiles for a variety of different fish at www.liveaquaria.com that might be useful to you.
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Puresouthern
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)14:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

haname wrote:
Mollies are not recommended for a 10 gallon or for beginners, though they do well in hard water.

Platies are ideal for a 10 gallon, hard water tank. I think it's a good idea to look for fish that thrive in the kind of water you already have, but as Huntress stated, most fish are adaptable.

There are some profiles for a variety of different fish at www.liveaquaria.com that might be useful to you.



That is the first time I have ever heard that one. Why are they not recommended 1) for a 10g tank and 2) not for beginners?? They don't get very big and they are relatively hardy. They are livebearers just like platies so the fact taht they procreate a lot can't be it. So why are you saying that arent recommended?? Confused
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haname
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)14:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mollies do get large, and are very active fish, which is why they are not best in a 10 gallon tank. Liveaquaria.com recommends a minimum 30 gallon tank for mollies, and a 10 gallon minimum for platies.

That is not to say mollies absolutely can't be kept in a 10 gallon, it's just that they are not best in a 10 gallon. The black sailfin molly can get up to 6.5 inches in length. The regular black molly grows to about 3 inches.

As for the care level, the molly is not generally classified as 'easy care' because they are sensitive to less than optimum water quality. Brackish or even marine water is best for them, and even in the freshwater aquarium they need salt added.

This is what I have read about mollies. I haven't kept them, except at the very beginning of my fishkeeping experience when the pet store employee recommended them for my newly cycling 3 gallon tank. We had and subsequently killed 5 of these guys over the course of a couple of months (replacing dead with new fish) before learning the facts about this fish.
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Puresouthern
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)14:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

haname wrote:
Mollies do get large, and are very active fish, which is why they are not best in a 10 gallon tank. Liveaquaria.com recommends a minimum 30 gallon tank for mollies, and a 10 gallon minimum for platies.

That is not to say mollies absolutely can't be kept in a 10 gallon, it's just that they are not best in a 10 gallon. The black sailfin molly can get up to 6.5 inches in length. The regular black molly grows to about 3 inches.

As for the care level, the molly is not generally classified as 'easy care' because they are sensitive to less than optimum water quality. Brackish or even marine water is best for them, and even in the freshwater aquarium they need salt added.

This is what I have read about mollies. I haven't kept them, except at the very beginning of my fishkeeping experience when the pet store employee recommended them for my newly cycling 3 gallon tank. We had and subsequently killed 5 of these guys over the course of a couple of months (replacing dead with new fish) before learning the facts about this fish.



Yea but I"m not talking your sailfin molly which I just found out do a lot better in atleast brackish water. I'm talking about one of your little hybrid mollies which is what I believe a dalmation is and I'm relatively a beginner and these are some of my easiest fish and I'm getting ready to move them from my 55 to my 10g, thats why I asked you that. In most cases with mollies as long as the water is hard and alkaline mollies more than just fine.

I've never been to liveaquaria.com but this is what Tropical tank had to say about mollies



salt to the water is not essential as long as the water is hard and alkaline.

they also say that even a sailfin tops out at 4inches. I would find it hard to believe that 1 male and 3 females wouldnt be fine in a 10g tank.

Thanks Haname for sharing your opinion with me.
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haname
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PostPosted: 2004.11.19(Fri)15:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

salt to the water is not essential as long as the water is hard and alkaline.


May be true.

Quote:
they also say that even a sailfin tops out at 4inches. I would find it hard to believe that 1 male and 3 females wouldnt be fine in a 10g tank.


28 inches of molly is a lot for 10 gallons of water, considering that mollies are prodigious waste producers not to mention offspring producers.

In the gallery here on AoA, the sailfin is said by its keepers to grow to 15 cm and is recommended for a min. 100L tank. The platy on the other hand, is recommended for a min. 50 L tank (closer to the 10 gallon size).

On Liveaquaria.com, the molly is recommended for a 30 gallon tank minimum, while the platy is recommended for the 10.

There is no doubt that there are different opinions on what works. Some people insist on keeping large South American Cichlids in a 40 gallon tank. Is it possible? Sure, it's possible.

At any rate, mellonhead will hopefully consider all the available information and make a wise choice for the 10 gallon for his/her daughter.
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