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Saltwater Aquarium - environmental ethics?
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Jimbob
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Joined: 27 Feb 2004
Location: London, England

PostPosted: 2004.03.21(Sun)12:52    Post subject: Saltwater Aquarium - environmental ethics? Reply with quote

I am considering setting up a Saltwater aquarium in addition to my existing freshwater tank. I have been a freshwater fish keeper for many years and have attained my personal goals in this field; providing a great deal of pleasure for myself. friends and family, achieving some breeding and maintaining a well planted aquarium with my favorite, healthy, fish.

I have no problem with the expense, challenge and commitment of setting up and maintaining a saltwater aquarium and I have to say that this forum is one of the best I have found for extensive research and experience

The problem I am struggling with the 'environmental ethic's' aspects of saltwater. My local stockist
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Agent Smith
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Joined: 24 Jan 2004

PostPosted: 2004.03.21(Sun)15:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

you have an exalent atitude and I'm sure your will do very well at this aspect. IMO, there are 2 important ways you can help reefs:

1. buy sound fish. your LFS should at least have a vauge idea of were there fish are coming from, at least region and whether they are MAC (marine aquarium concil ) certified. MAC is a fairly new organization that inspects collertor's facilitys, capture methods, and shipping methods to ensure they will provide maximum survival rates. they don't certify firms that use inapropriat methods like cyanide or ship substanderedly.

cynide is a fairly old method of capturing fish but unfortunilty, its a very bad choice as it kills the environment around were the fish are caught and greatly stresses the fish. cynide typicaly has a 90% survival rate. the conscienus marine aquarist by robert fenner has a chapter dedicated to cynide and to avoid fish that have been colected using it. and its probably the best book for new marine aquarists.

aquaculture of marine life is somewhat new compared to fresh water but is become a viable alternitive to wild caught. Oceans, Reefs and Aquariums and ERI international are 2 of the larger companies using aquaculture.

2. research. do your homework: find out which fish are good choices, meaning for the reefs, you budget, and your care level. TCMA, reef secrets by alf jacob nilson and svein fossa, and the new marine aquarium by mike paleta are all good choices for resurch, although there are many exalent books out there. knowledge will provent costly mistakes both finacily and environmentaly.
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http://www.tropicalresources.net/progeny for fish keepers 12 to 17.
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karlas
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Joined: 07 Feb 2003

PostPosted: 2004.03.25(Thu)8:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are becoming more and more farm raised corals and fish available in the hobby. For corals I've started seeing some that are listed as a generation. (2nd, 4th) expample. this means it was cut from existing corals as frags and tank raised.

Also if you see any business with a ORA sign or certificate. This company specialazes in tank raised fish and only sells to retailers. There are others out there but thats the main one that I know of.

http://www.orafarm.com/species.html
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Agent Smith
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Joined: 24 Jan 2004

PostPosted: 2004.03.25(Thu)8:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

edit: I said cynide has a 90% survival rate. I ment 90% mortality rate or 10% survival. Embarassed
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-Jared B
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