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zoffoperskof
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Joined: 19 Jun 2004
Location: Whitesburg, GA

PostPosted: 2004.07.26(Mon)23:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Choice Words wrote:
The only chemical you need for a freshwater aquarium is something to remove chlorine and chloramines, without bacteria, aloe vera, ammonia reducers, etc etc etc.

This is a pretty broad statement. What about products that claim to remove metals from the water? I've been using Stress Coat for a while (different form Stress Zyme) mainly because it removes chlorines/chloramines AND gets rid of metals. Does anyone actually know if it gets rid of metals? Is it worth it putting that extra stuff in my aquarium to get rid of metals? I don't even know what metals it gets rid of (I'm hoping copper, lead, etc.)!

BTW, my LFS tried to sell me some bacteria starter while I was cycling, but the package looked really dusty, so I figured it was really old, and probably not any good. I guess I made the right decision. Laughing
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anonapersona
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Joined: 06 Feb 2003
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: 2004.07.27(Tue)6:42    Post subject: Just to muddy the water... Reply with quote

I've seen some evidence that using dried bacteria actually works.

I've used dry biowheels, not cleaned after use and stored in the attic in heat and cold for 9 months, and seen a high dose of ammonia plunge over the course of 7 days. Another test by someone else using a dry sponge filter saw similar cycled tanks effects in a matter of days.

I have a jar of dried mulm, filter dirt that I allowed to dry in the sun, maybe one day I'll test this.
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Cory
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Joined: 22 Jan 2005
Location: London

PostPosted: 2005.01.23(Sun)12:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

So Cycle is a waste of money then? I know never to use the doasge they reccomend on the bottles of these things (3 capfuls for a 20 gallon(UK) tank with the fertiliser for example Rolling Eyes ) but I would have thought it would help the tank. It's certainly never had a negative effect.
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Chaffe
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Joined: 21 Feb 2005
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: 2005.03.29(Tue)1:50    Post subject: Re: Just to muddy the water... Reply with quote

anonapersona wrote:
I've seen some evidence that using dried bacteria actually works.

I've used dry biowheels, not cleaned after use and stored in the attic in heat and cold for 9 months, and seen a high dose of ammonia plunge over the course of 7 days. Another test by someone else using a dry sponge filter saw similar cycled tanks effects in a matter of days.

I have a jar of dried mulm, filter dirt that I allowed to dry in the sun, maybe one day I'll test this.


I was interested to see this.

I set up my FW using the ceramic noodles left over from when the tank had a goldfish - 2 month gap from tear down to rebuild so everything had dried out - and I never did get an ammonia reading. Planted but not heavily.
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MarkLehr
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Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Location: Taylorsville, KY

PostPosted: 2005.04.07(Thu)20:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have always believed that dried bacteria will quickly cycle an aquarium. I have not had to cycle a tank in years. I have a 55 gallon tote full of used gravel and another full of crushed coral. I always use these substrates to set up my tanks and they always cycle within days. I've been doing this for well over 10 years now, and have done so no less than 100 times.
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MarkLehr
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Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Location: Taylorsville, KY

PostPosted: 2005.04.07(Thu)20:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

As to the original question of using an established freshwater filter to set up a marine aquarium, I have a very different opinion.

I believe that the secret to successful saltwater aquariums is to be extremely patient with every step you take. Even if your idea can work, I am concerned about the desire to rush the process. We would have no way to determine the stability of the system and if you have a Nitrite spike in 3 months we will have no way of knowing if the filter ever really established properly.

I would start with nothing short of a clean aquarium and/or used marine filter media. Take your time. Be patient. Consider every decision for several days before taking action. When it comes to marine, less is more!
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KDodds
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Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Location: Suffern, NY

PostPosted: 2005.04.07(Thu)21:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

First, the "theory" that all bacteria responsible for nitrification are either FW or SW is not true, there are some that can and do thrive under both conditions. Second, warm-stocked "cultures" are of little use except maybe as nutrient loads. Third, refrigerated cultures do seem to be of use in stalled cycles, especially those where nitrIte is holding steady above unreadable for extended periods of time. And last, as has already been stated, bacteria will, most often, occur "spontaneously" with no "culture" intentionally added, making even products that are valid completely unnecessary and a pretty high costing "unnecessariness" at that.
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MarkLehr
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Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Location: Taylorsville, KY

PostPosted: 2005.04.10(Sun)20:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

KDodds wrote:
Second, warm-stocked "cultures" are of little use except maybe as nutrient loads. .


Can you offer any explanation as to why aquariums cycle very quickly when using "experienced" dry gravel? I'd appreciate your opinion on this issue. I have never understood why this happens, but there is not doubt it does for me in my years of fishkeeping.
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