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Problem with Congo Tetras.
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Jules3
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Joined: 27 Dec 2010

PostPosted: 2010.12.27(Mon)21:08    Post subject: Problem with Congo Tetras. Reply with quote

I have a 29 gallon aquarium, it has been up for approximately a month and a half. I have two female Congo Tetras and a male. I also have 3 Boesemani Rainbows in the tank. I just noticed that all three Tetras have brown around their mouths. I also just noticed that one of the Rainbows has white on his upper part of his mouth. I know they don't have ich. I had my water tested two weeks ago and the Nitrite/Nitrate's were high. I lessened the feeding. Everything else looked good. Ammonia was also tested and that was fine. I haven't done any water changes on it yet.

I can't seem to get the fish to sit still for longer than a second to take a picture of what is going on.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Jules
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diademhill
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Joined: 18 Apr 2007

PostPosted: 2010.12.28(Tue)3:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nitrite poisoning.

Do a 30% water change and add tow tablespoons of plain salt or sea salt to the new water along with dechlorinator.
Then do daily 20% water changes.

Do purchase liquid test kits - just a nitrite one if cash is tight - and keep testing until there has been zero nitrite for three days - then you can drop back to weekly 10% water changes.

Boesmanii rainbows and congos are not good choices for a tank less than 4' long.
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Jules3
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Joined: 27 Dec 2010

PostPosted: 2010.12.28(Tue)10:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tested my nitrite and nitrate and both are really good! (brought a water sample into the local aquarium) Ammonia is good. pH is a little high but that is because of city water here and theirs runs high as well.

Thanks for the advice. I am not sure about doing the frequent water changes as you suggested since there doesn't seem to be a problem with the nitrite/nitrate.
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KhiaraFish
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Joined: 18 Aug 2010
Location: Saint Paul, MN

PostPosted: 2010.12.28(Tue)12:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you give us a more specific reading, like a reading in PPM? That would help us to diagnose your fish.
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diademhill
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Joined: 18 Apr 2007

PostPosted: 2010.12.28(Tue)19:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jules3 wrote:
I tested my nitrite and nitrate and both are really good! (brought a water sample into the local aquarium) Ammonia is good. pH is a little high but that is because of city water here and theirs runs high as well.

Thanks for the advice. I am not sure about doing the frequent water changes as you suggested since there doesn't seem to be a problem with the nitrite/nitrate.

Good is not good enough.

If you haven't done any water changes and the nitrite has already gone down to zero ( leaving the fish damaged and with the darker blood that is a symptom of nitrite poisoning) you would be seeing a high nitrate reading.

The cycle typically takes about six weeks so having completed is possible but nitrates would be high - certainly not good.
Normal maintenance requires weekly water changes of 20% - 25%.
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the KOZ
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Location: portland oregon

PostPosted: 2011.01.14(Fri)8:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a fan of salt in fresh water tanks at all.but if you have to rock salt aquarium salt only. Not plan table salt and some sea salts are not OK do you want to kill her fish.Also a lot of fish can not handle SALT.Second most water problems are solved with weekly or bi weekly water changes yes you have to do them.or you will have sick fish and plants think of water as food the minerails in it get use by the many creatures in your tank and am not just talking fish and plants.also it's the only way to remove ammonia and nitrates no your filter won't do it all and carbon won't remove ammonia like many of you think.plus it keeps populations of pathogens and parasites down.
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diademhill
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Joined: 18 Apr 2007

PostPosted: 2011.01.14(Fri)10:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nitrite poisoning is one of the few things that salt will help with in a freshwater tank.

Water changes are an important part of aquarium keeping and the OP doesn't seem prepared to do this?
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the KOZ
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Location: portland oregon

PostPosted: 2011.01.15(Sat)23:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay let's look it this and allow me to explain.let's start by looking at what nitrite poisoning dose to the fish.
typical sign of nitrite poisoning is respiratory distress.
gills may appear brownish in color some fish may even start head standing or gasping at water surface.

THE REASONS WHY
nitrite is absorbed across the gills and is taken into red blood cells.here it joins with oxygen carrying pigment hemoglobin to form methemoglobin.In this form hemoglobin cannot carry oxygen.now once significant numbers of red blood cells are affected it can not supply enough oxygen to it's body.

SO YOU KNOW
Normal hemoglobin is red in color.
methemoglobin is brown in color.
So affected fish often show brownish-red colored gills instead of normal reddish pink.

RECOVERY
Recovery can only occur by replacement of these methemoglobin cells with new unaffected one's

TO ANSWER YOU
Yes in sever cases adding salt to the water will help.
this is because of chloride ions from salt compete with nitrite ions at the gills.reducing the number of nittrites absorbed.

So in short
Just adding salt to the tank is a stop gap measure.like puttin pressure on a gun wound you stop the bleeding but the real problem is still there.

What I do and you should consider
water changes dilute pathogens and add essential components that are used by the many animals , flora and fauna of the common aquarium.
Stocking levels,feeding practices all must be evaluated.

myths
a completely enclosed system is a pipe dream.
even that little globe with a few plants,some agile and one or to shirmp or fish and light.slowly winds down in time with the use of nutrients and minerals never being replaced like in extremely vast ecosystems.
Yes Yes they go on for many year and if large enough decades but there not forever,and at what cost to the animals that live in them.
simi enclosed systems were you do water and gas exchange and light.just not food last even longer.
but were not taking about these systems.Were very small animals and flora are used.Were talking about a fish tank a man made simulated environment that requires a greater balance on your part as a fish keeper

So in closing
DO FRACKING WATER CHANGES.It's good for you and them!!!!!!!!!!
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