Aquarium & Tropical Fish Site
Tropical Fish Forums
Aquarium fishkeeping around the world!
 
ChatChat  HelpHelp   Search BoardSearch Board   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Check your private messagesCheck your private messages   Log inLog in   RegisterRegister 
Red-knobbed starfish help
 Forum Index > Marine Fishes and Corals  Reply to topic   Post new topic
Author Message
anissa0672
New Members


Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Location: Florida

PostPosted: 2009.12.21(Mon)20:21    Post subject: Red-knobbed starfish help Reply with quote

Okay I bought this starfish a few months ago cause I thought it was beautiful and seemed easy. I recently noticed that the starfish has started acting weird. I see it curl it's arms up and it looks dead. I have tried to research this topic and can not find any information. I just want to know if this is normal or not! I have tested the pH level, the ammonia levels, and the nitrate levels. Everything is normal and the tank is healthy and clear. What do I do now?
_________________
Thanks a million,

Anissa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger AIM Address
Funky Fish
Regulars


Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Location: Dublin, Ireland

PostPosted: 2009.12.22(Tue)9:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hard to say.
Don't take it personally but it is probably starving. Starfish don't have a great life expectancy in captivity in general, there are exceptions.
Most tend to fade once they have depleted their food source. I personally only think the biggest of biggest reef tanks can handle them, as slow and tranquil their appear, they eat plenty.
You personally probably did nothing wrong however the mistake may have been the purchase. I think brittle stars, although not so colourful have a better captivity life expectancy, so if you like starfish you may have better luck. However saying this, give the tank time to restock the food as your current starfish may have finished it all.
_________________
Funky Fish
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2009.12.22(Tue)10:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

FF is correct.
Please see my notes on the failure of Starfish and other
Ehinoderms in captivity here; no. 27 on the list:
http://www.aquahobby.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=17688

I also made several comments on this 3 page thread:
http://www.aquahobby.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=31617
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anissa0672
New Members


Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Location: Florida

PostPosted: 2009.12.22(Tue)11:47    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

I really want to thank you for your response and effort in making me feel better. Would it be best to turn him loose in the ocean to have a better chance at surviving? I can't stand the thought of him dying! Very Happy
_________________
Thanks a million,

Anissa
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger AIM Address
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2009.12.22(Tue)14:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unless it came from Florida waters, I would not release it into the wild because that can expose the local fauna to non-indigenous species and diseases; (that's probably how we got a breeding population of Lionfish on the east coast of the U.S.) you could just return it to your dealer where you bought it or give it to someone with a really large and well-established reef tank, like maybe a public aquarium. Did you try stick feeding it with a few small pieces of fresh clam meat or shrimp; I think the evidence shows they cannot survive on such foods for long, but that may help a little temporarily until you can find a better home.

Unfortunately, many collectors and suppliers are not aware of their hyper-sensitivity to pH and salinity changes, and the lengthy slow-drip acclimation period required by these animals, so I suspect they are doomed from the start before they ever get to the hobbyist. They are often categorized and marketed as "scavengers" and/or "janitors" but in reality they are also voracious predators with very specialized feeding habits.
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
 Forum Index > Marine Fishes and Corals All times are GMT - 6 Hours Reply to topic   Post new topic
Jump to:  
  You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2008 phpBB Group

oF <=> oC in <=> cm G <=> L