Aquarium & Tropical Fish Site
Tropical Fish Forums
Aquarium fishkeeping around the world!
 
ChatChat  HelpHelp   Search BoardSearch Board   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Check your private messagesCheck your private messages   Log inLog in   RegisterRegister 
Questions abt denitrator set-up
 Forum Index > Marine Equipment and Chemistry  Reply to topic   Post new topic
Author Message
evo6
New Members


Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Location: HK

PostPosted: 2009.06.21(Sun)12:39    Post subject: Questions abt denitrator set-up Reply with quote

Hi all,

I am from HK and this is my first post.
Recently, I bought a BM denitrator for my new RT
I just followed the steps in the instruction:
Filling the "black and white" bio-balls (dunno whether its a right translation in ENG, hope u guys get my meaning), then fill the denitrator with the water from the tank, adding a spoon of white sugar and finally run the circulation pump.
Many users said that after 1-2 weeks, the water from the outlet should be with stinky bad-egg smell. However, what I sensed was alcohol smelling.
The denitrator has already been "self-running" for a month (as I still didn't connect it with the main tank)
What should I do?
Is the smell of the alcohol a normal indicator of the growth of the anaerobic bacteria in the denitrator?
Pls advise!
thanks in advance!!

evo6
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2009.06.21(Sun)22:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure, I think you should contact the manufacturer and check with them on it. Can you provide a link to a description of the exact unit you are using?
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
evo6
New Members


Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Location: HK

PostPosted: 2009.06.22(Mon)11:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

PLS click this link:
http://www.bubble-magus.com/en/productShow.asp?id=904
This is wt I am now using.
Ummmm, I think the manufacturer may not be kind enough to provide me with the detailed info for the set-up procedures, otherwise the methods should be printed on the instruction as well.
Anyway, do u have any general info abt that?
I am worried abt when should I connect it to the main tank and begin the system. I just don't want to foul the water as I just added 70lbs of LR to the tank. Embarassed
Thank you very much!
Look forward to seeing advices!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2009.06.22(Mon)23:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes well I went to that website and sorry to say I am not impressed with their communication. If they cared about you as a customer they would have detailed, downloadable user manuals online for their products. If a manufacturer won't even take time to have their website translated properly into english, then people like me cannot learn about their products and I would never buy them. Sorry, I can't offer you any advice on that gizmo. Here's an example of their text... it makes no sense it's just jibberish...

"BUBBLE-MAGUS was born in china under a situation of rapidly growing marine feeding view. BM designer always keep idea with practicality, high efficiency and quality. We pay attention to products in perfect combine with efficiency & appearance, and innovation technique that especially in products worthiness. We will always do the best on feeding technique of marine view and equipment extend, try to BM become an international brand well know." Shocked

What I CAN do is give you some general advice about denitrators, and I can tell you I have tried them years ago but with little success. Denitrators attack the symptoms but not the source of the problem, which is often related to poor husbandry, overcrowding, bad substrate, weak skimmer, etc. That's not to say they don't work
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
evo6
New Members


Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Location: HK

PostPosted: 2009.06.25(Thu)8:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

sigh.....I now regret having bought this, I should try AB instead.

This is the detail of my aquarium:
150L
pH 7.8
NO2 = 0
NO3 = 10ppm
2x Eheim 2215 with MA bio rings as filter medium
hang-on type skimmer (Skimmate is viscous enough!!)
Dymax 150W HQI 14000K

I am sure the N-cycle in the system is OK.
Now, there are just few shrimps and a hermit crab in the tank as well as
70 lbs LR.
As for fishes, I decide to have a pair of clown fish and some gobies.

There are 2 questions for the system:
1) Should I remove some bio-rings from the canister filter, some says bio-rings create much NO3, and they suggest Seachem "denirates/matrix" instead.
2) Is the pH too low? I know the optimum should be 8.3-8.4.
Is pH Buffer a good choice to stabilize the pH? or use other filter medium to increase pH?

FloridaBoy, thank you very much for your replies!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2009.06.25(Thu)21:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reducing or eliminating the artificial filter media will reduce production of nitrates, but may not solve your pH problem completely and will not substitute for good husbandry. You may need to increase your turnover rate, maybe add extra pumps behind those live rocks to get detritus moving and suspended. Make changes slowly.

Most marine hobbyists target a pH range from 7.8 to 8.5, so no need to panic. Since seawater NATURALLY has a proper pH of approx. 8.2, and artificial salt mixes are usually in tune with this, I generally do NOT suggest adding a lot of buffers or other chemicals to suddenly "boost" or artificially "manipulate" the pH in marine aquaria. These products will work, however sudden changes in pH can be create a lot of shock, and should be avoided. In a typical marine setup, things will slowly shift lower (more acidic). This is a NATURAL process, (very SLOW) and proper pH can usually be maintained with good husbandry such as water changes, which are very important. What is your regimen for water changes?

Let's talk about substrate. You did not mention your substrate, what is the depth and material? In my experience, MOST rising nitrates and acidic water conditions are simply a result of poor maintenance and a stagnating, detritus-filled substrate. Let's focus on the source, not the symptoms.
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MarkLehr
Moderators


Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY

PostPosted: 2009.06.28(Sun)6:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree that you should consider removal of your biomedia, as this type of filtration is generally at odds with what you are trying to accomplish. The protein skimmer and live rock will function more effectively, keeping nitrates low and alkalinity more stable, upon removal of the biomedia.

You also need to consider the reason behind the use of a canister filter on a marine aquarium. Canisters trap particulate matter and organic waste. If you are willing to clean the filter media inside the canister filter every 2 or 3 days, then they can be beneficial, but otherwise you are causing an input of phosphate and nitrate into your aquarium. I personally would not use a canister filter on a marine system, except for sporadic polishing of the water after scrapping algae, etc.

I do think the pH level is an indicator of possible problems. I think it confirms what I've said above and what Florida Boy alluded to. You are relying heavily on biological and mechanical filtration, causing breakdown of organic acids. These acids remove carbonates from the water, lowering alkalinity, and allowing for wider swings in pH.

FloridaBoy and I approach the hobby differently on this next point. I do believe in adding chemicals. He does water changes to achieve a similar result. However you get there, you need to be testing alkalinity and calcium to ensure that your aquarium is capable of maintaining the proper ratios to oneanother of the major ions that make up seawater. When calcium gets low (or high), and when alkalinity get low, other ions such as magnesium and borate begin to deplete. The overall stability of the water depends on the stability of these major ions.

I test for alkalinity and calcium weekly. I add Kent Marine Super Buffer DKH to maintain alkalinity at 8 to 12 DKH. I add Kent Marine Liquid Calcium to maintain Calcium at 400 - 460 ppm. On my reef, I generally need to add Calcium daily. On my FOWLR, I generally need to add Calcium weekly, just to keep up with the growth of coraline algae.

After over 15 years of keeping marines, I honestly feel that not testing for alkalinity and calcium is one of the primary mistakes that newcomers to the hobby make. It is something that you can not visually observe, and the long term consequences and costs are to extreme to skip this step in marine husbandry.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
 Forum Index > Marine Equipment and Chemistry All times are GMT - 6 Hours Reply to topic   Post new topic
Jump to:  
  You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2008 phpBB Group

oF <=> oC in <=> cm G <=> L