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What plants can tolerate high p.H. level?
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macika
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Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Location: Canada, ON, Toronto

PostPosted: 2008.09.29(Mon)20:36    Post subject: What plants can tolerate high p.H. level? Reply with quote

Hello!

My questuion is: what plants can tolerate higher p.H. level, like 7.8-8.2 p.H? And what plants would die off in this higher amount of p.H.?
thanks for answering my questions!
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FISHBOY3
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Joined: 26 Feb 2008
Location: Australia

PostPosted: 2008.09.29(Mon)21:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know vals and java fern would tolerate it and I think anubias would to.
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P@V
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Joined: 26 Jan 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: 2008.09.30(Tue)8:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

From experience with one of my tanks with high pH Vals grow really well. I was getting so much production out of them every month I was taking a bag full to the LFS for them to sell.
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Dusko
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Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Location: Sweden

PostPosted: 2008.09.30(Tue)12:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

People you are mixing up pH with GH here Smile
I grow all sorts of plants with 7,8-8pH.

Valls prefer higher Ca and Mg levels and that means GH not pH.

One should never count that high pH necessarily means hard water Smile
My tap water is 8.2pH and 3GH (very soft) and 2KH Shocked Wink

Don't worry about the pH in planted tanks. Plants will lower it after a few month and the pH will stay around approx 7.6pH

Keep your GH at around 5-8GH for best results so your plants (hard and soft water ones) have enough of Ca and Mg.

Plants usually don't grow in peoples tank because they don't get any extra NPK. Dose nutrients and everything will be just fine Smile

Regards, Dusko
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macika
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Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Location: Canada, ON, Toronto

PostPosted: 2008.09.30(Tue)21:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dusko wrote:
People you are mixing up pH with GH here Smile
I grow all sorts of plants with 7,8-8pH.


Plants usually don't grow in peoples tank because they don't get any extra NPK. Dose nutrients and everything will be just fine Smile


Hi!

what NPK means? So it doesn't matter the p.H. value for plants? what about GH then? Only valisneria can tolerate higher GH value? because I have a cihlid tank and I need to raise the pH or GH? Now what?? Very Happy
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Darkblade48
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Joined: 21 Jun 2004
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: 2008.10.02(Thu)6:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

macika wrote:


Hi!

what NPK means? So it doesn't matter the p.H. value for plants? what about GH then? Only valisneria can tolerate higher GH value? because I have a cihlid tank and I need to raise the pH or GH? Now what?? Very Happy


NPK stands for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, respectively. pH value for plants does not play such a large role, as Dusko already mentioned. gH is more important (relatively) because plants do require Ca and Mg (calcium and magnesium) for proper growth.
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macika
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Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Location: Canada, ON, Toronto

PostPosted: 2008.10.02(Thu)23:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Darkblade48 wrote:
macika wrote:


Hi!

what NPK means? So it doesn't matter the p.H. value for plants? what about GH then? Only valisneria can tolerate higher GH value? because I have a cihlid tank and I need to raise the pH or GH? Now what?? Very Happy


NPK stands for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, respectively. pH value for plants does not play such a large role, as Dusko already mentioned. gH is more important (relatively) because plants do require Ca and Mg (calcium and magnesium) for proper growth.


Ohh I seeeeeee!!! More GH is much better for plants! thanks!
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mujacko2002
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Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Location: Philippines

PostPosted: 2008.10.13(Mon)3:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mabuhay!

I just want to be cleared about this pH or Gh thing though I don't have any test kits to test for the said parametres but what I've read from the internet is that if you have a high pH the plants will have a hard-time utilizing the CO2 and nutrients thus making it harder for it to thrive in ones setup. Any clarifications will be highly appreciated

TIA

Godbless
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bumper
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Joined: 07 Dec 2004
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada

PostPosted: 2008.10.13(Mon)22:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is more co2 available at a lower pH. Generally the more co2, which acidifies the water, the lower the pH. When you run an airstone, run a sump or have high surface turbulence, you drive the gas from the water and you will have a increased pH deprived of co2.
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