Aquarium & Tropical Fish Site
Tropical Fish Forums
Aquarium fishkeeping around the world!
 
ChatChat  HelpHelp   Search BoardSearch Board   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Check your private messagesCheck your private messages   Log inLog in   RegisterRegister 
diatom algae problem
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 Forum Index > Marine Fishes and Corals  Reply to topic   Post new topic
Author Message
Sacrophyton
Regulars


Joined: 05 May 2007

PostPosted: 2008.09.27(Sat)18:14    Post subject: diatom algae problem Reply with quote

Hi, I've recently been having problems with a golden-brown algae (if it's not diatom, sorry) that has been overgrowing my tank, despite my best efforts. I scrub the rocks and glass every other day, but that only alleviates the problem. As of now, my equipment list is as follows; 40 gallon breeder tank with power compact lighting, a trickle filter that I converted into a sump, AquaC remora protein skimmer, Phosban phosphate reactor, and an Iwaki external return pump.
My parameters are; 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 0.1-0.5 nitrate, 8.4 pH, 0 phosphate.
I don't have any other circulation at the moment, because my only other powerhead is a Korella that agitates my LPS corals no matter where I put it. I realize that circulation is part of the problem, and I am going to rectify that very soon.
Does anybody have any suggestions about what to do, besides more current? My LPS corals, particularly my bubble coral, hates more than a medium amount of circulation, so I would prefer not to place my Korella back in my tank...
Thanks!
_________________
I'm not a pessimist; I'm a realist who lives in a world that sucks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2008.09.27(Sat)19:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you tried Turbo and Astrea snails? There are some fish including some of the blennies and some tangs, that are good grazers. Snails are the most widely used scavengers, and generally the best choice. How long has this tank been set up?

Also, how are your encrusting corallines doing on your live rock? Some authors suggest corallines produce chemicals that reduce the growth of micro-algae. Making sure you have good coralline growth with correct calcium levels may help with your less desirable micro-algae.

Other than that you might try experimenting with different lighting, it sounds like your basic parameters are okay.
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sacrophyton
Regulars


Joined: 05 May 2007

PostPosted: 2008.09.28(Sun)10:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have about 12 turbo snails, 5 astrea snails, and about 14 nasarius snails... My coralline algae covers about 50% of my rock, but the diatom algae grows over it. My tank has been up and running for a little bit over a year. I'm going to try a 10% water change, not to change the water chemistry, but to get after the dead zones under my live rock.( I'm taking out some of the smaller pieces of rock soon to eliminate the dead zones) I'll adjust the timer on my lighting, and start feeding my LPS corals more regularly.
_________________
I'm not a pessimist; I'm a realist who lives in a world that sucks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dusko
Moderators


Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Location: Denmark

PostPosted: 2008.09.28(Sun)11:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

That Gold-brown algae could be some kind of colonial protozoan and not algae at all Smile
This can happen in older set-ups. Organic build-up, low O2, weak circulation (dead zones) and even low KH might bring these up.

Test for KH and if low up it to 10-12dKH especially if feeding LPS often. Something has to buffer the system. Also more feeding more O2 demand for bacteria to decompose the organics.

Quote:
My LPS corals, particularly my bubble coral, hates more than a medium amount of circulation, so I would prefer not to place my Korella back in my tank...


I would advise to bring in the Koralia but place it so it doesn't hit into the Bubble coral. Let it create a good surface agitation for gas exchange.

Dusko
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2008.09.28(Sun)18:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Three more areas that may help you sort this out...
Check your current calcium level (help those corallines), check your turnover rate and can you describe your substrate.
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sacrophyton
Regulars


Joined: 05 May 2007

PostPosted: 2008.09.29(Mon)18:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

FloridaBoy; My calcium is 390 ppm , my turnover rate is about 400 gallons per hour from sump to tank, and my substrate is crushed coral sand.
Dusko; I'm guessing it is algae, because my snails consume it with an appetite. I do have a couple of dead zones far back in my tank that I'm going to eliminate by taking out some of the smaller pieces of rock in that area. I don't have a dKH test kit at my house, so I will go to my LFS soon to find out.
_________________
I'm not a pessimist; I'm a realist who lives in a world that sucks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2008.09.30(Tue)21:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boosting calcium to the range of 450-480 ppm might help encourage more coralline growth. I can't prove it, but again, some authors have suggested corallines may produce chemicals that reduce the growth of micro-algae. How deep is that substrate...
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dusko
Moderators


Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Location: Denmark

PostPosted: 2008.10.01(Wed)11:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Boosting calcium to the range of 450-480 ppm might help encourage more coralline growth.


That is OK, but I wouldn't advise raising Ca levels before testing for KH Smile
E.g. if you have low 6.6KH but very high Ca at 450-480 ppm, there is no way you will be able to raise your KH. I tried so did others I know and it simply doesn't work.
First check that your KH is OK (something between 10-12KH) if lower top it up with KH+ products for salt water like Salifert KH+ or similar (powder).
Once you got the desired KH start boosting Ca levels to 450 or higher.

390 ppm of Ca is a very good Calcium level (IME with customers on daily bases and my own shop tank). It is usually when KH is a bit low then folk get some sort of problems.

Organics build-up is very closely related to carbonates/bicarboantes which are involved in binding organic Carbon released during decomposition.
Also Oxygen levels are closely involved in decomposition of Organic matter. Bacteria needs ample supplies of O2 in accordance to brake the waste down very fast (or fast enough).

More snadshifters and shredders like shrimps, starfish, crabs, snails to help keeping the substrate's surface free of dirt.

I would also advise to run for a week with some high quality Active Carbon (Rowa) to help in removing Organics from the water column.

Do weekly wc to re-set the system. 20% per wc every week. Did it and never experienced any issues with corals nor algae.
Remove with hand dirt which had accumulated on rocks by waving over the live rock (just before the wc)

Regards, Dusko
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
FloridaBoy
Moderators


Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2008.10.01(Wed)15:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Dusko, good input...

Sacrophyton, still wondering how deep is that substrate, also if the snails are consuming it, why not add a few more in your 40 gal... maybe try the Trochus and Cerith snails to see if they target your problem algae better than the others, just a thought... here's a link:
http://www.reefbasics.com/reef-safe-snails.html
_________________
Keepin' marines happy for 25 years
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sacrophyton
Regulars


Joined: 05 May 2007

PostPosted: 2008.10.01(Wed)20:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

My sand substrate is about 1/2 inches in depth, and I have 14 nasarius snails burrowing through it. I'd prefer to find the root of the problem rather than add more animals to post-pone it. It seems like my O2 levels are close to maxed out, because the diatom algae in my tank is producing bubbles of gas, rather than dissolving the gas into the water column. I got my LFS to test for KH, it was at 11.
Do you guys know what this algae is living on? As I said, my nitrate is almost undetectable, ditto for my phosphate, and I haven't been using any additive such as selcon for months.
_________________
I'm not a pessimist; I'm a realist who lives in a world that sucks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
 Forum Index > Marine Fishes and Corals All times are GMT - 6 Hours Reply to topic   Post new topic
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Jump to:  
  You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2008 phpBB Group

oF <=> oC in <=> cm G <=> L