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native tank
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sam_17
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Joined: 07 Aug 2007
Location: Idaho

PostPosted: 2008.01.24(Thu)17:42    Post subject: native tank Reply with quote

Hi

I was thinking about diffent ideas of what to put in my 29 and I've been researching native tank and they seem pretty cool. Do you think I could put a few small bluegill in a 29. And also does anyone know of small native fish to go in a native tank. I live in Idaho and I've heard about darters but I don't think that there are any here. I do we have minnows, bluegill and sculpin. Any ideas or suggestions?
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Last edited by sam_17 on 2011.02.03(Thu)6:20; edited 1 time in total
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Marcos Avila
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Joined: 05 Feb 2003
Location: Santo Andre (Brazil)

PostPosted: 2008.01.24(Thu)19:46    Post subject: Re: native tank Reply with quote

sam_17 wrote:
Do you think I could put a few small bluegill in a 29.

I just don't understand this type of reasoning. There's no such thing as a small bluegill, only a young bluegill. You put the fish in your tank as a small juvenile and they'll obviously want to grow old and large - 40 cm in the case of bluegills. Not taking that into account is a fish-HAVING mentality...fish-KEEPING involves caring for the fish for its entire life, not just as juveniles. Considering that bluegills in addition are schooling fish, a suitable tank would need to be 10 times larger than what you have, to house a small group of them.

For a tank like yours you should be looking at species like dwarf livebearers and rosy-red minnows.
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Jacko
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Joined: 20 Mar 2007
Location: Washington

PostPosted: 2008.01.24(Thu)22:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say go with the sculpin, I have successfully kept one (his name was Ghosty) in a 29 gallon for 6 months untill the 29 gallon was taken down and he got stranded outside in an empty snail shell without our knowledge. Slightly reclusive and they need a live diet if they are taken from the wild. Do remember however to check with your state gov. to see if the fish you plan to collect are in fact legal to collect.

Though, I too would say none of the others, but I don't know what type of minnows you are talking about. Shiners have always interested me and I know they are found in South Dakota but don't remember the other states I was in. What type of Native fish are you looking for? Idahoian fish or North American fish?
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sam_17
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Joined: 07 Aug 2007
Location: Idaho

PostPosted: 2008.01.25(Fri)18:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

actually after thinking about it, I think I'd rather just do an easier to maintain tropical tank.
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Last edited by sam_17 on 2011.02.03(Thu)6:20; edited 1 time in total
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Psyfalcon
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Joined: 14 Feb 2003
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: 2008.01.26(Sat)23:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really wouldn't call the bluegill a schooling fish. They hold their similarities to CA cichlids pretty well in this case. In the wild the do form loose groups in a common spawning ground but are highly territorial about their subspace.

In a tank, they would likely be less shy with others of their own kind, like, say, firemouths seem to be, but they're also not a true schooling fish like the tetras.

They still get way to big for a 29 though.
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UncleWillie
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: 2008.02.07(Thu)7:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sam, I think a native tank would be great (you must do what you think would be enjoyable and not 'the norm'). If you decide to do a native tank, like Jacko said, you could go for more of the stream species rather than pond. Sculpin would be cool (I've never had any in aquaria), but Shiners and Darters are very pretty, or even daces. I am not sure of the status of certain species in your area, but I would certainly find out and look into getting a collection permit. These species don't need a heater, no need to be fed often. In the wild, it can be 3 weeks with no meal, and most will be just fine. A 20 gal would be fine for these species.
Just an aside, after to years of keeping darter and shiners, my friend is trying to get his redline darters (Etheostoma rufilineatum) to breed in his 20 gallon. Being in Tennessee, we are are spoiled by having such a variety of darters and shiners, and I am not sure of the species or availability in Idaho. But seriously consider what you want out of this tank.
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Lab_Rat
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Joined: 26 Jul 2006
Location: San Antonio, TX

PostPosted: 2008.02.09(Sat)12:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could get blue finned killifish. They're a native US species. I've never seen them for sale, but they're often in with ghost shrimp shipments (how I got mine, LFS gave him to me). I've also gotten a darter with ghost shrimp.
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UncleWillie
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: 2008.02.14(Thu)18:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

As ambell posted about killifish... It reminded me about the American (Florida) flagfish. I recently purchased a pair for my 46 Gal and they are pretty fun to watch. If stream natives are out, you can check these guys out. http://www.aquahobby.com/gallery/e_Jordanella_floridae.php They have a sunfish (Lepomis sp.) type look other than it lacks a spiny dorsal (only has one spine) and lacks the three anal spines. They don't get very large but very nice to look at and observe. Just thought I'd mention it, because they are native to Florida and some parts of Bama. Also, many pictures on the web don't do the speices must justice, many look like fat carp, but this isn't the case. These fish are many times regularly availble at LFS.
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