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Plants in a marine tank?
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Tarawa
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Joined: 19 Feb 2007

PostPosted: 2007.06.04(Mon)18:40    Post subject: Plants in a marine tank? Reply with quote

I'm going to start up a nano-reef tank in my old 10 gal tank, and I've been doing quite a bit of reading on it, but I havent come across anythind saying anythign about plants in a marine tank. Can tropical plants do OK in it, or are there specific plants needed?
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xcooperx
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Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Location: West Covina, CA

PostPosted: 2007.06.05(Tue)1:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure if this tropical plants can be put on a marine tank, but the thing I know is Anachris can be put on a Brackish water
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Flame Angel
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Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: 2007.06.05(Tue)4:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uhh no tropical plants (like wisteria) can't go in a marine tank...they will die from the salt (I'm guessing).
But you can get marine plants such as caulparia (sp)
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unissuh
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Joined: 29 Mar 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia

PostPosted: 2007.06.05(Tue)4:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

To my knowledge, the only plant that will survive full marine salinity is the red mangrove. I think the second most resistant aquarium plant would be java fern, which goes up to about 1.011 (specific gravity)...thats a long way off from the standard 1.024 though.

Otherwise look into algaes: Chaetomorpha sp, Gracilaria sp, Caulerpa sp (if you must)...there are heaps out there. Pretty luminescent ones too if you can find 'em. Lots easier to grow algaes than plants too from what I hear, they're like weeds.

EDIT: Right, see Plantbrain's post below. I forgot about sea grasses.
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Last edited by unissuh on 2007.06.06(Wed)4:28; edited 1 time in total
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Plantbrain
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Joined: 10 Dec 2003
Location: The swamp

PostPosted: 2007.06.06(Wed)0:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seagrasses are great, harder to grow though.

here's a pic of my tank and these are all plants/macro algae:



Regards,
tom Barr
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DF Bobo
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Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Location: Canada

PostPosted: 2007.06.06(Wed)13:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

in the ocean, there are no higher vascular plants like what we would find on land or in freshwater environments. the mangrove grows in brackish areas but otherwise, all marine plants are just various species of algae. even kelp is algae. you can have a "planted" saltwater tank, but it won't really be with plants. some species of decorative algae that I know of include caulerpa sp., halimeda sp., and purple coralline algae.

that fact is with marine tanks, most people turn to corals but there are plants and herbivores in the ocean too.
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Plantbrain
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Joined: 10 Dec 2003
Location: The swamp

PostPosted: 2007.06.06(Wed)13:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

DF Bobo,

Then what are Seagrasses then?
You may want to correct your comments.
http://www.worldseagrass.org/biology.htm

They are monocots, they are flowering vascular plants that live submersed in marine environments from soft reefs in Florida to hard rocky intertidal zones in California.

There are over 60 species.

Note the link below here does not address rocky cold water species like those in California.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seagrass

Regards,
Tom Barr
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