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Algae Pic of my 10 G, solutions?
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supamii
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Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles, USA

PostPosted: 2006.12.31(Sun)19:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

bobfish, when I do blackouts, I notice that my plants grow incredibly well. I observed that too much darkness is bad, but realistically dark reactions are very necessary. true, sensitive plants like glosso are at risk, but perhaps a 2 day black out should be the alternative.

my guess is that the reason why you have to watch for ammonia after treating antibiotics is probably because it is possible to damage the bio-filter present.

I'm not arguing against erythromycin, I just don't think a black out is bad for all plants.
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bobfish
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Joined: 21 Aug 2006

PostPosted: 2007.01.02(Tue)20:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree 100% there are so many hardy plants out there. I had left a bucket of old tank water in the basment for about I week with a clump of japanse ivy and it was growing like crazy. so yes it does depends on what kind of plants. but here is a though are the plants growing faster because they might be streching for light?
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pH.6.5 temp 78-81 soft water
Med-heavy planted tank
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supamii
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Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles, USA

PostPosted: 2007.01.03(Wed)11:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

"These reactions take the products of the light-dependent reactions and perform further chemical processes on them. There are two light-independent reactions: carbon fixation and the Calvin-Benson cycle."

I didn't find too much in detail on wikipedia, but this seems to be enough for me.
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gala
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Joined: 01 Jan 2007
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada, North America, Earth

PostPosted: 2007.01.03(Wed)16:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

The reading I've done tells me that blue-green algae is indeed a photosynthesizing bacteria, so the idea of using antibiotics to get rid of it makes sense. I am also thinking that any time we use an antibiotic we are also wiping out the nitrogen-cycle bacteria, so if you choose this method watch your water parameters and water change like crazy while you slowly recycle your tank. Plants and fish should be happy then.

I have the same problem but I am ignoring it and hoping it will fix itself without me, so far my plants are fine and only the glass is affected (and my no longer white sand eww!).

good luck!
gala
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supamii
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Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles, USA

PostPosted: 2007.01.03(Wed)17:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

from my experience it probably won't go away. it will probably get worse. Confused
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gala
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Joined: 01 Jan 2007
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada, North America, Earth

PostPosted: 2007.01.04(Thu)6:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

My ignoring it is sort of an experiemnt. More like an experience really. I like the look of totally wild overun with life aquaria, and it pleases me to know that this bacteria has invaded because maybe other tiny organisms can use it as a food source. Do you know of any microscopic type of life that would be happy to be the second link in the food chain?

If it gets too gross though, eventually I plan on removing as much of the sand as I can and covering the rest in gravel. that might give the parts that are infected the dark so it will die off without my having to black out the whole tank. Because the plants are just getting established I don't want to stress them anymore right now. Smile
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supamii
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Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Location: Los Angeles, USA

PostPosted: 2007.01.04(Thu)11:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

This has been stated in prior posts already, but:

BGA seems to show up when you have an incorrect ratio of phosphate to nitrate. And both of those elements are macro-nutrients for plants - so you wouldn't be stressing out anything at all. all you'd have to do is have a blackout to kill whats there and then start correcting your water immediately. BGA can seriously overrun the tank within 12 hours with the light on. I've personally experienced it.

BGA also has a nasty smell as well, --- another incentive to start fixing your water parameters.
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