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coral beauty has a erosion on one side of his/her body
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art_of_war
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Joined: 17 Nov 2006

PostPosted: 2006.11.17(Fri)9:46    Post subject: coral beauty has a erosion on one side of his/her body Reply with quote

I can't understand it. This fish is gorgeous. I've only had it for about a month now and the first week or two it was doing fine. But the last couple of weeks, it has what some have referred to as "hole-in-the-head" disease. I've heard mixed opinions on this subject and how it happened and all the med-solutions to this don't seem practical. Some have said to let in some bit of "natural light". I've tried that but I don't see how that will help; if anything it would cause problems with algae bloom. Quarantine the fish and treat it for possible "ich". I've done that (w/ no live rock present; hence the urge to scratch is minimized); still no improvement. Get a cleaner shrimp; fine...he gets cleaned but how much cleaning will suffice? The cleaner shrimp does its job (although, sometimes reluctantly). I'm not going to give it a freshwater bath (w/ the whole higher pH thing setup); it doesn't seem right since it may most likely put shock upon the fish and he/she may die a very horrific death.

Weird. I don't have that many fish in my tank. It's only 55 gallons and there's only the coral beauty; a blue tang (whom is my most favorite and just as lively); two ocellaris', a gramma, and a tiny little yellow gobbie which for the life of me; I have no idea where it is in the tank. None of my fishes (spelling?) are any bigger than 2 inches and they all appear to be doing well in the tank. They all get along.

The coral beauty keeps to him/herself; the fins aren't frayed; no white/black spots visible (well...no visible white ones at least). It swims the ENTIRE tank so it can't possibly be stressed. It eats as much as my blue tang (perhaps even more). I truly don't see scrapping him/herself against rocks. So why does it look like the side of him/her look so bad?

Can anyone help me?
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Mike612
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Location: Quebec, Canada

PostPosted: 2006.11.17(Fri)15:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well if it's hole in head it can be deadly. I believe it's usually caused by dietary problems. Your angel should be eating lots of greens (formula one, formula two, spirulina, and nori) and also some brine and mysid shrimp.
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FloridaBoy
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Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2006.11.17(Fri)23:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

See if you can post a photo before we make any assumptions here.
We need to rule out an injury or other issues.
Need test results for current water parameters including nitrate please, also adding tank history, substrate details and filtration. Adding a description of your system to your profile is a good idea.
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art_of_war
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Joined: 17 Nov 2006

PostPosted: 2006.11.18(Sat)1:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

The temperature is okay...approx. 78 F.
NH3 is zero
NO2 is zero
NO3 is less than 20 ppm (mainly b/c I change the water normally)
pH is 8.2 to 8.4

The tank itself is 55 gallons and it's a month and a half old. I do have some small hardy mushroom corals in the tank that are doing rather well also. As for a picture, I will figure something out but the other fishes are completely normal. The coral beauty itself swims the entire tank like nothing is wrong but the erosion along the side of it is bad...I mean bad. I don't see it rubbing against the rocks; however it moves rather swift throughout the tank to focus my attention.

I will admit that I cannot minimize the amount of tiny bubbles that return from the protein skimmer. It really pisses me off. I have to keep adjusting the return hose. The protein skimmer itself is a hang from behind the tank setup. So...at all times there is a very very minimal amount of tiny bubbles throught the tank which unless I completely unplug the skimmer, there's nothing I can do.

People have told me that very tiny bubbles can be detrimental and still others have said a little bit isn't too bad. Doesn't every tank need a little bit of dissolved oxygen because I'm sure my DOC's are low. I've not had one death in my tank but I monitor all activity like a hawk. So, I'm well aware of any unusual activity. For a very short period of time, I did have a 3 inch mandarin dragonet (which I traded in for credit). I couldn't get it to eat! It scoured the entire tank for copepods; it must have cleaned off every single rock in my tank. Afterwards, it just perched on the substrate blowing kisses but for the life of me, I couldn't ween her into anything. It was going to starve to death. I did so much research on that creature and before I burn a hole in my pocket, I traded it in...along with a mean little damsel.

The substrate is typical play sand (WHICH I CLEANED) according to all researched recommendations and then some. Filters are fine; all the other fishes are great. Still, the hole in the head thing...really baffles me.

I'll see what I can do about a picture too.

Thanks...ahead of time.
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FloridaBoy
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Joined: 04 Jul 2004

PostPosted: 2006.11.18(Sat)15:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmmm, I still hesitate to advise you until I see the fish.
What is the depth of sand substrate and what is your filtration?
Nitrates are getting high for sensitive inverts.
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art_of_war
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Joined: 17 Nov 2006

PostPosted: 2006.11.20(Mon)10:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's sad. My coral beauty has died. I don't know what say about it either. I checked all my parameters. I even double checked it several times in the last several days. The other night I get up; go down to check out the tank and I see it on its side laying on the bottom of the tank. At first I thought it was sleeping but then I tap the glass and nothing happened. So, I poke it with small net and still nothing. Seeings that it's usually the MOST active fish in the tank; I had to conclude that I have failed to take care of this most beautiful fish.

It really is bizzare to me. I truly have no idea how this could have happened. It couldn't have been stressed. There's so much swimming room and so few fish (not like the gramma was ever going to do anything anyway). Hell, I thought the coral beauty and the regal tang was going to mate given close they were to each other.

Oh well. Hey Florida, is there anyway you could post a topic on caring for soft or hard corals? Like water quality parameters based upon tank sizes? How often you should check it and the like? I was reading something on diseases of corals such as bleaching but what else is out there regarding corals?
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FloridaBoy
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PostPosted: 2006.11.20(Mon)13:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, as I suspected this may not have been HLLE.
Check out the book section for some good reading on corals and invert care.
For quick answers to specific questions post them by topic and I'm sure an advisor will assist you. Keep an eye on your other fish.
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sirreal63
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Joined: 21 Feb 2004
Location: Meadowlakes, TX

PostPosted: 2006.11.20(Mon)16:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a side note...a 55 gallon tank is way too small to house a Regal Tang and the aggression from the Gramma could have been a contributing factor. I am sorry to see a beautiful fish go. I hope the others fare better but I would plan on a tank upgrade very soon or trade the Regal back in, it should never have been put in a 55 which is the worst size tank ever made.

If I read correctly the tank has been set up for a month and a half and you have had the Angel for a month...that leaves two weeks for cycling and I suspect the tank wasn't cycled which also may have contributed to it's death. A weakened immune system from ammonia poisoning would render the fish helpless to fight off an infection.
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art_of_war
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Joined: 17 Nov 2006

PostPosted: 2006.11.21(Tue)9:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

sirreal63 wrote:
As a side note...a 55 gallon tank is way too small to house a Regal Tang and the aggression from the Gramma could have been a contributing factor. I am sorry to see a beautiful fish go. I hope the others fare better but I would plan on a tank upgrade very soon or trade the Regal back in, it should never have been put in a 55 which is the worst size tank ever made.

If I read correctly the tank has been set up for a month and a half and you have had the Angel for a month...that leaves two weeks for cycling and I suspect the tank wasn't cycled which also may have contributed to it's death. A weakened immune system from ammonia poisoning would render the fish helpless to fight off an infection.


Not necessarily. Contrary to what you may believe, the tank was cycled within two weeks time. In the beginning, I had close to 70 lbs of live rock in that tank in which I'd say about half was already partially cured. I tested the tank for pH, NH3, NO2, NO3 and specific gravity everyday within that second week in which everything stabilized quite nicely. I admit I also used a yellow tail damsel as a "canary bird" to assist in the cycling process which seems wrong in many cases but it did the job and that damsel is back where he started (the pet store); despite its size: it's very resilient, swims the whole tank, is not particular about its dietary needs, is quite beautiful. AND, given its hardiness to erratic conditions; it would not surprise me if it could adapt to brackish and maybe even freshwater conditions. However, as we all know, given the territorial tendencies of that fish as well as its hostile behavior despite its size, AND the speed at which it moves, I refuse to keep such a mean fish in a tank with peaceful ones. Besides, I won't let a 3 dollar fish stress out a bunch of 15 dollar ones.

All necessary water parameters were met without the need for any special provision. Even now, everything is fine despite the loss of the coral beauty.

I test every two or three days and ever since, the tank norm has been as follows: pH will fluoccuate between 8.2 and 8.4, both NH3 and NO2 are 0, and N03 is about 20 ppm <--which as I understand it, is acceptable; I clean some of the substrate from time to time; top off and I change anywhere between 10 to almost 20% of the water when I notice the nitrates go up (but it seems as if the water change has been frequent; nearly once a week). My protein skimmer which is designed for a 240 gallon tank is working properly as is my filter which is designed for about the same size.

I admit that the gramma likes to open his mouth real wide to both my regal and yellow mimic tang but neither feel threatened by him. It's strange because the tangs don't really establish a specific territory in the tank.

It also seems strange to have to do this but in order for me to know whether or not my water quality is good at this point and that I'm doing my duty OR if the water is piss poor and I suck at this hobby, I also put a soft coral in the tank. I know that my justifications seem a bit moot given that "hole in the head" syndrome is still a mystery to many experienced aquarists.
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sirreal63
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Joined: 21 Feb 2004
Location: Meadowlakes, TX

PostPosted: 2006.11.21(Tue)12:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

One thing is for certain...fish do die and most of the time we never know why.

Out of curiosity what brand of test kits are you using? I have a few different ones, one in particular reads my nitrates at 20 and the other two kits read them as undetectible.
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