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Willie's Sunfish (Hook-n-Line Sunfish) UPDATE
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UncleWillie
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: 2011.08.04(Thu)18:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks coryfan. The fish definitely come stare at the front of the tank as soon as you walk in the room. This is usually because they get fed in the evening when I return home from work. If you wait around a bit, they settle down and you can see them go back to their normal interactions (swimming and squabbling).
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UncleWillie
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: 2011.10.25(Tue)12:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sunfish are not only one of my favorite types of fish to keep in aquaria, fishing for them is also a favorite activity of mine. Like many other youngsters growing up in the Southern US, fishing for "bream" was a great pastime. I past a milestone in May and decided to purchase a toy for myself. I bought a 4-piece fly rod, reel, line and a bunch of poppers. Any free minute I had, I hopped down to the creek or a local river and tried to catch some fish. All of these fish are caught and released.

Beastly Bull bluegill in prime spawning condition:


Male bluegill in summer. For those who do not know, the Lepomis sp sunfish spawn multiple times throughout the summer. Bluegills will nest in large colonies and often spawn on each full moon from May/June to August. This is a male showing that he is in spawning condition, but not spawning or guarding a nest at the moment (e.g., it's not a full moon).


A beastly male bluegill in prime spawning condition (notice more purple than the golden color seen in the previous fish). Note the swollen nape and breast.


Adult male bluegill in current (October) condition.


Young green sunfish. Sex is very hard, but I'm betting female. Males should have more intense colors - particularly during this time of year.


Male redbreast from the pond.


Sexy male redbreast from the river. This guy had brilliant blue flanks, jet black pelvic fins, and intense orange belly. This guy was a real looker!


Female redbreast


Young male redbreast


Bull male redbreast from the river (these river redbreast tend to be much smaller than the redbreast caught in ponds). Check out that mouth!
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unissuh
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Joined: 29 Mar 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia

PostPosted: 2011.10.26(Wed)6:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do they put up quite a good fight?

Nice how you can actually get natives in your rivers. I think most of the water bodies close to where I am either have gambusa, carp or trout (which for some ridiculous reason are actually purposefully stocked in most of the major water bodies here). Don't hear much about the local galaxias anymore, unfortunately.
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Fishing in the Rivers of Light
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UncleWillie
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Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: 2011.11.09(Wed)12:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uni, they do indeed put up a fight considering their small size. On ultralight tackle or fly rods, they are very fun to catch. That laterally compressed body gives them some power when trying to swim away.

That is quite unfortunate about being overrun be exotics. A colleague just returned from New Zealand, where the whole purpose of the trip was to catch brown trout (fly fishing) in the rivers to try and lower their numbers. It's a shame that so many fish get stocked before the consequences of such actions is unknown.

I am quite fortunate to live in most diverse (aquatic fauna wise) area in North America. Although our warm temperatures just south of where I live have a lot of issues with plecos, armored catfish, walking catfish, oscars, African cichlids, etc. I good cold snap in winter (like two years ago) will knock their numbers back a bit.

The real issue where I live has been the introduction of flathead and blue catfish. While they are native to the US, they are not native to Atlantic Ocean drainages where I live. These guys are crushing the sunfish (my favorite). They have pressured the population to earlier age at maturation, smaller adult size, and shorter lifespans. The sunfish response to this enormous apex predator has been to grow fast, reproduce at a tiny size, and die young. It's a shame. Wow - huge tangent... back to work.
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