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Great reef tanks: David Saxby
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FloridaBoy
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PostPosted: 2008.12.26(Fri)23:19    Post subject: Great reef tanks: David Saxby Reply with quote

These are older but still a pretty good read, enjoy...

Possibly one of the highest- rated reef tanks in the world is in London and owned by well-known reefkeeper, David Saxby.
http://www.practicalfishkeeping.CO2.uk/pfk/pages/show_article.php?article_id=151

Karen Youngs visits David Saxby's 3,700 gallon marine system and finds out how some of his ideas can be adapted for systems of a more modest size...
http://www.practicalfishkeeping.CO2.uk/pfk/pages/show_article.php?article_id=83

Video here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLRubZGWXiY
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Moment
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PostPosted: 2009.02.27(Fri)12:24    Post subject: a tip I noticed from one of these articles. Reply with quote

I noticed he mentioned using a phosphate remover from day one. Do most people use a phosphate removing resin in their reefs. Also if so, would it also be good practice in a 20g nano, with sps, mushrooms, and zoas?

Anyone have suggestion?
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FloridaBoy
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PostPosted: 2009.02.27(Fri)13:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

In low concentration, Phosphate is actually one of the top essential trace elements considered essential for good marine aquarium water. But higher levels are usually a big problem. Reduction of phosphates (PO4) is important for SPS tanks, because higher phosphates quickly lead to unwanted algae, and delicate corals and other invertebrates are irritated by lots of phosphate. When dissolved PO4 rises above 0.03/4 ppm, you are almost always going to start getting slammed with micro algae blooms (not good).

This rising phosphate scenario is almost a given in marine aquaria; because phosphates come from uneaten food, eaten food (waste), the water used to thaw the food, bacterial die-off, algae die-off, even the carbon we use can leach phosphates into the water. In short, phosphates (like nitrates) are always adding up.

For the basic marine fish tank it's not so critical, but for sensitive reef tanks the ideal level is zero, with an upper level of 0.05 ppm-mg/l to 0.1 ppm considered acceptable (depending on the author quoted and the sensitivity of your animals).

What to do...

Water changes can help, however make sure you're not adding even MORE phosphates with these water changes, because many cities have surprisingly high levels of nitrates and phosphates in the tap water. That's right, test your tap water! Reverse Osmosis (RO) water may be required and is a common choice among reefers, but to be really effective against high phosphates you may need two de-ionization stages (in series) on the RO filter. Yes, these cartridges will need replacing. Another thing that can help reef tanks is kalkwasser solution, which is often used for SPS happiness, and has been associated with lowering phosphate levels.

There are plenty of reliable phosphate removing products, such as Sea Chem's PhosGuard, Thiel Aqua Tech's X-Phosphate, Kent Marine's Phosphate Sponge and Coralife's Phosphate Remover, but these are usually exhausted quickly and are only part of the solution not silver bullets.

Some hobbyists with high phosphates who think they can add these products once every 6 months and forget about it may be in for a rude awakening. For example if you go the Seachem website they clearly state, "in an environment with an excessively high phosphate reading, PhosGuard will exhaust rapidly (4
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PostPosted: 2009.02.27(Fri)22:02    Post subject: phosphates Reply with quote

I didn't neccasarily think I had phosphate problem. I just wondered if per the articles suggestion, constant phosphate removal was a good idea. I checked my tap water, it was 0. I tested reef and it was barely perceptable. Less then .2, so I don't think its an issue. I was getting a bit of red algae on glass though. Its from tricky feeding schedual though. I have a scooter blenny that I feed daphnia to. I also feed rotifers to coral at night. I find that its imposible to not but too much in, and it goes over tank when I turn pumps back on. That and feeding of other fish and coral tends to add up. I change 30% every week. I'm not complaining, I think I have great parameters, just was thinking maybe guy had good suggestion about phosphate resins. I don't think it will make much diff for me. Low enough levels to be good for corals, but shouldnt be whats causing my occasional algae. Just tricky, just have to feed more careful and keep up changes.










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Tigerissey
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PostPosted: 2009.02.27(Fri)22:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had read those articles in PFK and was amazed by the tank then, what I had not seen was the video, that just shows how stunning the tank really is. Photographs can only show so much, whereas the video really brings the tank to life. Whilst in the process of preparing for my first nano tank (1st step into marines), I had been intending to use phophate remover from the beginning as he is not the only advocate of that, I was aware testing needed to be done regularly and replaced frequently.

What surprised me the most in the second article was where he recommends an octopus for keeping mantis shrimp and crabs in check. I am sure not all tanks are suitable for an octopus and a beginner (such as myself) should not IMO be taking that advice. I was not sure about the sea urchin, could you shed any light on that florida boy.

I would like to know if you have any ideas why he uses caulerpa rather than chaeto in the sump, in the reading I have done most people recommend chaeto.

The tank is certainly something to aspire to, and the video was well worth watching, although I don't think I will ever get a tank that big be it fresh or salt water.
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PostPosted: 2009.02.28(Sat)8:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

I personally have seen as much advocation of chaeto as I have caulerpa. I personally don't have a sump, but I think the general drift is that macroalgae as with any plant feeds on nutrients in tank that may have other wise been harmfull to livestock if left unchecked. I figure important thing is that the type of macro algae not have any other ill effects.

We have been considering adding a sump to our system for a while, but oddly we just keep making the display tank bigger instead. As far as net water volume and stability goes, same drift. We went from 5g to 14g to 20g. Adding more live rock and sand with each upgrade. As well as upgrading lights and filtration. I think 20 is a great size for a nano, still small enough to take it all in with a glance but not so small as to be as demanding as the 5g was. It allows for lots and lots of coral too. We have 2 diff zoas, a nice favite, richordia, a big ol' hairy mushroom, and another small mushroom colony, not sure exactly what they are. I have known but can't remember. Plus we have 4 fish, a ocelaris we have had from start, a scooter bleeny, a blue chromie, and yellow watchman goby. I just tested parameters yesterday. 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, -5 nitrates. And that was 3 days out from water change.

When you have an addiction its important to feed it though. I think since I don't want to go bigger on this display, I will know more seriously consider adding sump. Likely a 10g. That way I can happily cram some more livestock in.
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PostPosted: 2009.02.28(Sat)9:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tigerissey wrote:

What surprised me the most in the second article was where he recommends an octopus for keeping mantis shrimp and crabs in check. I am sure not all tanks are suitable for an octopus and a beginner (such as myself) should not IMO be taking that advice. I was not sure about the sea urchin, could you shed any light on that florida boy.


Tigerissey:
Yes, I agree the octopus is an odd addition, they are quite fond of eating not only crustaceans but also your fish! See my notes on octopus here:
http://www.aquahobby.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=17688

Tigerissey wrote:
I would like to know if you have any ideas why he uses caulerpa rather than chaeto in the sump, in the reading I have done most people recommend chaeto.


That's a good question! As I mentioned at the start this is an older article published in 2001, so he may not be using Caulerpa now. Wink

Although it was very popular years ago, Caulerpa is usually avoided these days due to the fact that it is prone to sudden die-off, when it can release dangerous toxins into your system. Certainly it can work for nutrient export, but if not aggressively maintained the results can be bad. Aquarists have seen some livestock losses due to this problem.

Other macro algaes will help avoid this issue.
Most consider Chaetomorpha and Gracilaria as better alternatives. More info here:
http://www.reefland.com/rho/0105/main2.php
http://www.reefcorner.com/SpecimenSheets/caulerpa.htm
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Tigerissey
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PostPosted: 2009.02.28(Sat)21:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Yes, I agree the octopus is an odd addition, they are quite fond of eating not only crustaceans but also your fish! See my notes on octopus here:
http://www.aquahobby.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=17688

Tigerissey wrote:
I would like to know if you have any ideas why he uses caulerpa rather than chaeto in the sump, in the reading I have done most people recommend chaeto.


That's a good question! As I mentioned at the start this is an older article published in 2001, so he may not be using Caulerpa now.

Although it was very popular years ago, Caulerpa is usually avoided these days due to the fact that it is prone to sudden die-off, when it can release dangerous toxins into your system. Certainly it can work for nutrient export, but if not aggressively maintained the results can be bad. Aquarists have seen some livestock losses due to this problem.

Other macro algaes will help avoid this issue.
Most consider Chaetomorpha and Gracilaria as better alternatives. More info here:
http://www.reefland.com/rho/0105/main2.php
http://www.reefcorner.com/SpecimenSheets/caulerpa.htm


Thanks for the info florida boy, will take a good look at that, its is a coincidence, I remembered after posting it was your info on octopuses sitting at the back of my mind that actually led me to question the use of them. I had planned on useing chaeto in the refugium but I will take a look at both articles before making a final decision.

Thank you.
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PostPosted: 2010.10.18(Mon)21:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice work! Your post is an excellent example of why I keep coming back to read your excellent quality content that is forever updated.
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PostPosted: 2010.10.20(Wed)4:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your kind words and best wishes for your success.
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